Tag Archives for " leadership development "

The Center for Sustainable Strategies Announces Expanded Services for Entrepreneurs, Small Business Owners & Non-Profit Organizations

SustStrat-SEETHRU

The Center for Sustainable Strategies

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

DENVER, CO – The Center for Sustainable Strategies (formerly Sustainable Leadership, Inc.) is expanding to serve clients from Denver, Boulder and Fort Collins, Colorado, specializing in helping bio-science and technology executives meet the demands of Colorado’s growing biotech, bio-science and technology industry.

The Center for Sustainable Strategies helps entrepreneurs and newly hired or recently promoted leaders transitioning into an executive role develop effective leadership practices and business development strategies in fast-growth bioscience and emerging technology companies. The Center for Sustainable Strategies CEO Christina Haxton said that in a fast-paced industry, it is essential that technologists, scientists and physicians transitioning into a business environment find the balance between achieving sustainable business growth, applying best leadership practices, achieving successful work/life integration and avoiding burnout.

Haxton, recently relocated from Steamboat Springs, Colorado, has over 20 years of entrepreneurial experience, a graduate level certificate in Evidence-Based Coaching for Executives & Businesses, Masters in Marriage & Family Therapy specializing in business partnerships, Bachelors in Psychology and over 25 years of healthcare industry experience, including over 10 years in management and board level experience in non-profit healthcare, economic development and membership organizations. Haxton is a co-author of The Character-Based Leader: Instigating a Leadership Revolution One Person At A Time, is an author of numerous articles, dynamic presenter and keynote speaker on the topics of Sustainable Leadership, increasing employee and executive engagement, improving productivity, resolving workplace conflict, transforming stress and avoiding or recovering from burnout.

About The Center for Sustainable Strategies
The Fort Collins office is located at 219 West Magnolia St. Suite #120 Fort Collins, CO 80521 with a second office in the Greater Denver Area. Haxton’s original company, Sustainable Leadership, Inc. an executive coaching and leader development consultancy has now expanded to include offering business growth and development services for small business owners and non-profit organizations. The Center for Sustainable Strategies provides specialized expertise in assessing, developing and implementing innovative solutions to effectively address executive and team development, employee engagement, strategic and succession planning and execution, as well as custom leadership development programs for small to medium-sized health care, bioscience and technology companies. The Center for Sustainable Strategies has offices in the Greater Denver and Fort Collins, Colorado areas.
###
For more information:
Contact: Christina Haxton   Email: Christina@ChristinaHaxton.com
Phone: (970) 387-8935

What is a Sustainable Leader?

Sustainability: the capacity to endure; to conserve resources; built to last.

What is a Sustainable Leader™?

teamwork_lift_earth_pc_800_clr_2960A Sustainable Leader is one who is built from the inside out, and the outside in, connected to the team by being an authentic, leader who genuinely cares about others.

A Sustainable Leader is resilient and an agile learner, built to last through uncertain and rapidly changing economic conditions.

A Sustainable Leader intentionally develops the potential in others, so they too can develop into exceptional leaders who can carry through the company’s mission and vision.

“In today’s fast-paced, high-demand and global business environment, being a Sustainable Leader™ who can stay focused, think creatively, easily manage stress and emotions, communicate effectively and set the standard in their organization will make the difference between a healthy, thriving and resilient company and an ineffective or worse, a non-existent one.” – Christina Haxton, CEO & Founder, Sustainable Leadership, Inc.

What steps does your company take to ensure it’s leaders and managers are Sustainable Leaders?

 

Professional Intimacy: The Secret of Sustainable Leaders

3 Keys to Becoming a Leader Who Will Last for the Long Haul

cbl christinas quote

My first opportunity to consciously stand up for my professional and philosophical beliefs about Professional Intimacy occurred in 1994. In the last year of my Master’s program, my thesis involved research on the process of creating a successful business partnership.

Using Appreciative Inquiry, our process resulted in a model of a synergistic triangle consisting of three equally key ingredients, where 1 + 1 = 3 (I was never good at math, but this makes sense … read on):

  • An Understanding and appreciation of self, as in intra-personal or emotional intelligence;
  • An Understanding and appreciation of other, as in interpersonal or social intelligence;
  • The resulting relationship system then gets created and continually loops around, offering each person the opportunity to develop as individuals and therefore re-contribute, thus co-create, a dynamic, complex system that becomes the unique, dynamic business partnership.

Leave your feelings at the door

In the early 1990′s the unspoken, unwritten rule in the business world was “Don’t Talk About Relationships, feelings or any of the soft, fluffy stuff humans were made of when delivering leadership or management training or when speaking to  businesses, managers or executive leaders about improving productivity or performance. I was directed to leave that stuff at the door and talk about “real” skills.  Don’t feel … just get to work!

I followed this advice for a while and felt my hands (and credibility) were tied behind my back.

Then I ignoring that advice.  After 12 years in business, our design resulted in not only building our own successful business and partnership, but also served as a model for our clients to build sustainable partnerships.

Through the process of developing Professional Intimacy as defined in my thesis in 1994 and even to  this day, I continued to learn and grow both intra-personally and inter-personally as a result.

The truth is this:  We learn and grow in relationship, not in isolation. Following the old rule and disregarding the complex and dynamic relationship systems we create through all of our relationships, however brief, is ridiculous.

Here’s the point: My thesis was nominated for publication in the college journal … an honor, for sure.  However, the committee stated it would only be considered for publication only if I changed the title.

Professional Intimacy was born

They objected to the phrase I used to symbolize our design for a successful business partnership: Professional Intimacy.

Because sexual harassment in the workplace was such a touchy (pun intended) topic in the early 90′s, the committee frowned upon my use of the phrase in the title. I stood my ground on principle because even though the rule was “Don’t talk about RELATIONSHIPS and WORK in the same sentence.”  I couldn’t (or wouldn’t) in good conscience back down. Besides, I have a strong oppositional reflex.

I ran across the dusty, bound thesis years later and wondered …

“Did I do the right thing in standing up for my values?”

“Would my career path have changed had I decided to belly up?”

“Would I have been able to help more people sooner?”

I suppose I’ll never know… What would you have done?

PS.  Check out  Chapter 19: “Professional Intimacy:  The key to being a Sustainable Leader” in the book “The Character Based Leader: Instigating a leadership revolution one person at a time” on Amazon or your favorite bookseller.

 

[sharebox5_no_border] [/sharebox5_no_border]

Bad Boss or Best Boss: How will your employees remember you?

I recently asked a group of CEOs if they could remember their worst boss … female mad boss

It was interesting to see the negative, almost painful in some cases, visceral reaction so many people had when remembering their worst boss.

Even though their bad boss experience happened many, many years ago, the memory was carved in stone.
When asked to remember their best boss, it was hard to miss the peaceful, almost inspirational look on their face.
Then I asked what their best and worst bosses did that earned them the title … I’m sure you can imagine the answers when they described the rude, sometimes aggressive, unfair, uncaring, disrespectful and distrusting behaviors and attitudes they could still feel even today.
Here’s the Aha! moment … the best bosses had the ability to show they cared for their people.  Best bosses offered authentic trust to their team.  Best bosses really listened …
And more.   Best bosses did these things in just a few moments … they conveyed caring and trust which made them memorable and worthy of being leaders these CEOs were aspiring to be more like …
If only it was that easy, I heard them say.
Well, it can be that easy and yes, you can be that effective.
You can be that Best Boss for someone else!
How?  Using the most effective strategies, tools and executive coaching support.
Get the psychological edge with a self-guided program with information and personal coaching from yours truly.
I’ve put together a special “thank you” gift just for your support of Sustainable Leadership and it’s only available for a limited time … click here for your tools to become the “Best Boss”
Thank you for spreading the word and the work and instigating a leadership revolution at the intersection of brain science, emotional intelligence and leadership excellence.
To Your Sustainable Leadership!
Christina
(PS. Please forward this email to a friend, colleague or if you really have the guts, a BAD BOSS!)
[sharebox4 sharetext=”Share This Page”] [/sharebox4]

Leaders: Your emotions are contagious!

Great Bosses & Horrible Bosses

For just a moment, remember your favorite boss.  You know, the one you said

you would follow anywhere if he or she ever left the company.  The boss for whom you came in early and stayed late for to meet a promised project deadline.  How would you describe his or her overall mood?  How did you feel when you were working for him or her?

Now, remember the boss you would never work for again in a million years.  The boss you worked really hard to avoid being in the same room with for longer than necessary.   The boss you had when hiding under your desk or in your closet was not beneath you.  How would you describe his or her overall mood?  How did you feel when you were around him or her?

Surprised?  Probably not.  Now, here’s the tough question:

If I walked in the front door of your office or showed up at your next team meeting, how would I describe the mood of the people who work for you?

Neural Wi-Fi:  Peas & the Interpersonal Neurobiology of Leadership

Pretend for a moment you are spoon feeding peas to a baby sitting in a high chair.  What do you do?  As you are putting the spoon to her lips, what do you subconsciously do with your mouth (whether you like smooshed peas or not) … You got it, you  OPEN your mouth and make an aaahhhh sound, in a sometimes desperate attempt to get her to do the same.  Why?  It works most of the time.  Instinct. Mirror neurons.

The truth is, recent research in brain science proves that for humans (and I’ll add chimps and horses), emotions are actually contagious because of mirror neurons.  The short explanation is mirror neurons in our brains are responsible for our “catching” the mood of other people without realizing it. Add to that fascinating fact that our brains are prediction machines and constantly are making connections to predict the future based on our past experiences.  Your grumpy boss could be in a good mood on Friday, however your brain won’t realize it and will automatically predict (or believe), he’s his usually grumpy self.

E-motion = Energy in Motion

Why does this matter for leaders, bosses or other people of influence?  If you can believe that your mood is reflected in the mood of your team, you may or may not like what you see in the “mirror.”

What? … So What?… NOW WHAT?

While you may read this and understand or you are reading it for the first time and think Wow!  that makes sense, what’s the “So What?”  Understanding is overrated.  It does not automatically lead to action or doing anything differently tomorrow.  Unless you make a commitment to take action and the more accountable you are publicly the greater the odds you harness the action potential of your Aha! moment and transfer it into action.  Feel free to consider using the ACE approach to change:

1.  Awareness:  Notice your mood.  Notice the mood of others.  Label the feeling (without judgement is the key).

2.  Choice:  How do you like what you see in the mirror?  If it’s what you want, keep going.  If it’s not what you want, what choices do you have in the moment?

3. Execution:  What is one small action you are willing to take in that moment?  You don’t have to effect change on anything, just take action to make it different.

4.  Repeat #1 What information did you gather?  What choice do you want to make now?  What action will you take next?  Just like directions on shampoo, rinse, lather and repeat.

Accountability: What are you willing to do in the next 24 hours to recognize and change the effect you have on the people in your company?  If you have the courage, feel free to post your commitment in the Comment box below.  (If you are not quite that brave, feel free to email me directly.  All responses are strictly confidential!).

“The Human Moment at Work” – Harvard Business Review article

“The Key Ingredients to Build Rapport” – Daniel Goleman, YouTube

 

[sharebox4 sharetext=”Share This Page”] [/sharebox4]

(Original post written for LeadChangeGroup Blog by Christina Haxton, MA LMFT)

The cat’s out of the bag: Even successful CEO’s need hugs

Scott Mabry posted this article from McKinsey Quarterly on his blog and all I can say is it’s about time the cat’s out of the bag …

Leading through times of exponential change is not for the faint of heart … and requires more character, stamina … and hugs than we ever imagined (or even Donald Trump would admit).

Sustainable leaders will be able to lead through the 21st century … and beyond.  Because these leaders will come back to center and know what REALLY matters.  And lead from who they are.  But first, a reality check …

Read what Josef Ackermann, formerly of Deutsche Bank; Carlos Ghosn of Nissan and Renault; Moya Greene of Royal Mail Group; Ellen Kullman of DuPont; President Shimon Peres of Israel; and Daniel Vasella of Novartis have to say about what it’ll take to be a highly successful CEO who won’t burn up or burn out:  Click here to read more in the McKinsey Quarterly journal …

To Your Sustainable Leadership,

Christina Haxton

Leadership Speaker, Author & Executive Consultant

Powerful Connections … Sustainable Leadership … Extraordinary Peace of Mind.

[sharebox4 sharetext=”Share This Page”] [/sharebox4]

 

3 Steps for Leaders to Build Trust: #1 … Reveal your softer side

How to reveal your softer side to employees

To become a trusted leader, communicate with compassion and try to connect personally with team members, writes Christina Haxton, who offers a three-step process for becoming a more empathetic leader. The first step is to reflect on your own personality to strengthen your emotional intelligence, she writes.

Read all three steps here:

SmartBrief/SmartBlog on Leadership

 

[sharebox4 sharetext=”Share This Page”] [/sharebox4]

Leaders: Do you have what it takes to lead from your seat?

Leadership Doesn’t Rest on Your Title nytimes.com

Terri Ludwig, a Wall Street veteran who now leads a nonprofit organization, says that all employees can learn to influence its direction. Do you have what it takes to lead from your seat? Read more …

Leader’s Survey: The 5 Fail Points in Leadership Training

Center for Creative Leadership, Colorado Sprin...

Image via Wikipedia

Do you wonder why leadership training programs fail to prepare leaders of today for tomorrow’s challenges?  The survey says …. “Avoid 5 Fail Points in Leadership TrainingDownload or listen now to the webinar on how to avoid wasting time and money on your personal or company’s leadership training and three key strategies to make your coaching or leadership development program truly pay off for the leader, for constituents and for the entire organization.

The bottom line is developing Sustainable Leaders:  Developing authentic leaders happens from the inside out and from the outside in … for more information go to Sustainable Leadership, Inc.

Leaders: 3 Keys to Effective Leadership Development Programs

The motivation behind my original post “What are the fail points in leadership training/development and Sustainable Leader’s Survey* were three-fold:

1. To identify the strengths and fail points in Leadership Development initiatives, with a special interest in identifying the challenges faced by newly promoted Senior Leaders (recent research states over 40% of newly promoted executives quit or get fired within the first 18 months in their new position).

2. To begin to identify practical solutions for the fail points in Leadership Development programs or initiatives for today’s leaders, especially newly promoted executives and senior leaders.

3. To use the responses to develop a value-filled, evidence-based Sustainable Leaders Development & Mastermind group for Senior Leaders who are highly motivated to drive positive change in themselves, others and in the organization by learning practical, effective and sustainable interpersonal and communication skills, and develop themselves as a leader from the inside out.

SUMMARY SO FAR: While the number of survey responses is not (yet) statistically significant, it appears there are definitely “themes” or gap areas emerging, that when filled, will allow a leader to full fill his or her responsibilities more easily, feel more satisfied in their role and harness the power of their own potential as well as others, to facilitate organizational change, to continue to develop inter-personally as well as intra-personally to achieve ongoing growth and sustainability in self and others.

(At Least) 3 Fail Points in Leadership Training:

1. Please Understand Me – One fail point reflects a need for leaders to master a significantly higher level of interpersonal and communication skills (i.e., Emotional Intelligence) and the skills to better and more deeply understand people’s motivators and drivers to gain cooperation and support to get the job done quickly and easily. Not to mention understanding one’s own beliefs, motivators/drivers and the infinite ways we will attempt to avoid pain (our behavior is a result of our feelings which is a result of B.S. – which is a topic of a whole other thread, I’m sure).

2. Leaders don’t exist in a vacuum – Another fail point is “training” the individual in a one day workshop (yes, I’m being sarcastic, but this is a HUGE waste of time, money and resources) and sending him back to the office to effect change inevitably fails. Minimally, this strategy fails to take into consideration the homeostasis of the system (i.e. culture) as well as the basic dynamics of the “rules of engagement” in human relationships and communication.

3. Lonely at the the top – The survey also indicated a significant desire for leaders do network and exchange solutions and ideas in conversations with other like-minded senior leaders. “It’s a great tool, but how do I use it in real life?” I use a “What? So What? Now What?” approach which has been a very helpful framework for my clients to use to go from knowing something, to doing it to being it AND transferring the learning for lasting change. “A fool with a tool is still a fool.” I love it.

To take the brief 8 question survey and participate in the tele-forum to discuss the results and begin to identify solutions for the fail points in developing leaders today, go to Sustainable Leader’s Survey

Thank you and keep posting your insights, resources and questions!